Hyaena Gallery

Great Wize Wizard.

Great Wize Wizard.


Bonus Gravy. #alien #creature #thing #weirdo #instagravy

Bonus Gravy. #alien #creature #thing #weirdo #instagravy


Monday morning Gravy. #alien #creature #thing #weirdo #instagravy

Monday morning Gravy. #alien #creature #thing #weirdo #instagravy


Another piece by Alfred Kubin. #destroytheday

Another piece by Alfred Kubin. #destroytheday


Alfred Kubin (1877 – 1959) was an Austrian printmaker, illustrator, and occasional writer. From 1892 to 1896, he was apprenticed to the landscape photographer Alois Beer, although he learned little. In 1896, he attempted suicide on his mother’s grave, and his short stint in the Austrian army the following year ended with a nervous breakdown. In 1898, He began a period of artistic study at a private academy run by the painter Ludwig Schmitt-Reutte. Kubin then enrolled at the Munich Academy in 1899, without finishing his studies there. The aquatint technique used by Klinger and Goya influenced the style of his works of this period, which are mainly ink and wash drawings of fantastical, often macabre subjects. Kubin produced a small number of oil paintings in the years between 1902 and 1910, but thereafter his output consisted of pen and ink drawings, watercolors, and lithographs.

Kubin is considered an important representative of Symbolism and Expressionism and is noted for dark, spectral, symbolic fantasies, often assembled into thematic series of drawings. Like Oskar Kokoschka and Albert Paris Gütersloh, Kubin had both artistic and literary talent. He illustrated the works of Edgar Allan Poe, E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Fyodor Dostoevsky, among others. Kubin also illustrated the German fantasy magazine Der Orchideengarten. The best known of Kubin’s own books is Die andere Seite (The Other Side) (1909), a fantastic novel set in an oppressive imaginary land. The Other Side has an atmosphere of claustrophobic absurdity reminiscent of the writings of Franz Kafka, who admired Die andere Seite. 


From 1906 until his death, he lived a withdrawn life in a small castle on a 12th-century estate in Zwickledt, Upper Austria. In 1938, at the Anschluss of Austria and Nazi Germany, his work was declared entartete Kunst or “degenerate art,” but he managed to continue working during World War II. #destroytheday

Alfred Kubin (1877 – 1959) was an Austrian printmaker, illustrator, and occasional writer. From 1892 to 1896, he was apprenticed to the landscape photographer Alois Beer, although he learned little. In 1896, he attempted suicide on his mother’s grave, and his short stint in the Austrian army the following year ended with a nervous breakdown. In 1898, He began a period of artistic study at a private academy run by the painter Ludwig Schmitt-Reutte. Kubin then enrolled at the Munich Academy in 1899, without finishing his studies there. The aquatint technique used by Klinger and Goya influenced the style of his works of this period, which are mainly ink and wash drawings of fantastical, often macabre subjects. Kubin produced a small number of oil paintings in the years between 1902 and 1910, but thereafter his output consisted of pen and ink drawings, watercolors, and lithographs.

Kubin is considered an important representative of Symbolism and Expressionism and is noted for dark, spectral, symbolic fantasies, often assembled into thematic series of drawings. Like Oskar Kokoschka and Albert Paris Gütersloh, Kubin had both artistic and literary talent. He illustrated the works of Edgar Allan Poe, E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Fyodor Dostoevsky, among others. Kubin also illustrated the German fantasy magazine Der Orchideengarten. The best known of Kubin’s own books is Die andere Seite (The Other Side) (1909), a fantastic novel set in an oppressive imaginary land. The Other Side has an atmosphere of claustrophobic absurdity reminiscent of the writings of Franz Kafka, who admired Die andere Seite.


From 1906 until his death, he lived a withdrawn life in a small castle on a 12th-century estate in Zwickledt, Upper Austria. In 1938, at the Anschluss of Austria and Nazi Germany, his work was declared entartete Kunst or “degenerate art,” but he managed to continue working during World War II. #destroytheday


Don’t forget #20dollardoodles with @therealbigtasty is today. 1-5pm. Come in, call or email your $20 drawing requests. #art #liveart #doodlewarrior

Don’t forget #20dollardoodles with @therealbigtasty is today. 1-5pm. Come in, call or email your $20 drawing requests. #art #liveart #doodlewarrior


Dog. #kurtz #apocalypsepuppy

Dog. #kurtz #apocalypsepuppy


Elite Fashion Boutique. #elite #fashion #boutique 

#ittakesavalleyvillage

Elite Fashion Boutique. #elite #fashion #boutique

#ittakesavalleyvillage


Two more versions of Diomedes Devoured by his Horses by Moreau #destroytheday

Two more versions of Diomedes Devoured by his Horses by Moreau #destroytheday


Gustave Moreau - Diomedes Devoured by his Horses, oil on canvas, 1865. 18”x15”

As the shadowy figure of Hercules observes from the background, wild horses rip apart the slender body of King Diomedes. Bodies of the horses’ previous victims lie piled to the right, above a pool of blood-stained water. This scene shows the dramatic climax from the eighth labor of Hercules, who was ordered to capture the four flesh-eating horses belonging to King Diomedes. Hercules killed the king in battle and fed his body to the horses, which tamed them. Gustave Moreau’s fascination with violent, emotionally charged subjects typifies mid-1800s French painting.

The horses are inspired by the art of da Vinci and the antique hero by the drawings of Michelangelo, while the setting is taken directly from drawings by the great Italian master Piranesi. #destroytheday

Gustave Moreau - Diomedes Devoured by his Horses, oil on canvas, 1865. 18”x15”

As the shadowy figure of Hercules observes from the background, wild horses rip apart the slender body of King Diomedes. Bodies of the horses’ previous victims lie piled to the right, above a pool of blood-stained water. This scene shows the dramatic climax from the eighth labor of Hercules, who was ordered to capture the four flesh-eating horses belonging to King Diomedes. Hercules killed the king in battle and fed his body to the horses, which tamed them. Gustave Moreau’s fascination with violent, emotionally charged subjects typifies mid-1800s French painting.

The horses are inspired by the art of da Vinci and the antique hero by the drawings of Michelangelo, while the setting is taken directly from drawings by the great Italian master Piranesi. #destroytheday