Hyaena Gallery

Christopher “Chris” Burden  (1946-) is an American artist working in performance, sculpture, and installation art. Burden began to work in performance art in the early 1970s, he made a series of controversial performances in which the idea of personal danger as artistic expression was central. His most well-known act from that time is perhaps the 1971 performance piece Shoot, in which he was shot in his left arm by an assistant from a distance of about five meters with a .22 rifle. 

One of Burden’s most reproduced and cited pieces, Trans-Fixed took place on April 23, 1974 at Speedway Avenue in Venice, California. For this performance, Burden lay face up on a Volkswagen Beetle and had nails hammered into both of his hands, as if he were being crucified on the car. 

Burden was referenced in David Bowie’s 1977 song “Joe the Lion,” Laurie Anderson’s 1977 song “It’s Not the Bullet that Kills You - It’s the Hole (for Chris Burden)” on the double LP “Airwaves,” and in the diary of Nathan Adler from the David Bowie album “1. OUTSIDE.” He was also mentioned in the Jeff Lindsay book “Dexter by Design,” and in Norman Mailer’s book “The Faith of Graffiti.” #destroytheday

Christopher “Chris” Burden (1946-) is an American artist working in performance, sculpture, and installation art. Burden began to work in performance art in the early 1970s, he made a series of controversial performances in which the idea of personal danger as artistic expression was central. His most well-known act from that time is perhaps the 1971 performance piece Shoot, in which he was shot in his left arm by an assistant from a distance of about five meters with a .22 rifle.

One of Burden’s most reproduced and cited pieces, Trans-Fixed took place on April 23, 1974 at Speedway Avenue in Venice, California. For this performance, Burden lay face up on a Volkswagen Beetle and had nails hammered into both of his hands, as if he were being crucified on the car.

Burden was referenced in David Bowie’s 1977 song “Joe the Lion,” Laurie Anderson’s 1977 song “It’s Not the Bullet that Kills You - It’s the Hole (for Chris Burden)” on the double LP “Airwaves,” and in the diary of Nathan Adler from the David Bowie album “1. OUTSIDE.” He was also mentioned in the Jeff Lindsay book “Dexter by Design,” and in Norman Mailer’s book “The Faith of Graffiti.” #destroytheday


Looks calming…

Looks calming…


There’s no place like home. #ittakesavalleyvillage

There’s no place like home. #ittakesavalleyvillage


Bonus Gravy. #alien #creature #thing #weirdo #instagravy

Bonus Gravy. #alien #creature #thing #weirdo #instagravy


Monday morning Gravy. #alien #creature #thing #weirdo #instagravy

Monday morning Gravy. #alien #creature #thing #weirdo #instagravy


Bob Flanagan (1952 – 1996) was an American performance artist, comic, writer, poet, and musician.   At a young age Flanagan was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, a condition which would influence his art and ultimately claim his life. Flanagan survived into his 40s despite the cystic fibrosis, an unusually long life considering those diagnosed with CF had a life expectancy of 17 years, and especially so since doctors did not expect Bob to live past the age of 7 or 8.

To battle his illness, Flanagan delved into the world of S&M, using a controlled pain to elevate his actual pain. As an artist, he destroyed boundaries between the stage and the hospital bed using wit and an uncompromising honesty. Some of his performances were notable for acts of extreme masochism (on at least one occasion he hammered a nail through his penis, while cracking jokes). He also wrote books and disturbingly humorous songs. 

He was the subject of the documentary SICK: The Life & Death of Bob Flanagan, Supermasochist (1997), a film by Kirby Dick, which covers the final years of Bob’s life. I can not recommend this film enough. #destroytheday

Bob Flanagan (1952 – 1996) was an American performance artist, comic, writer, poet, and musician. At a young age Flanagan was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, a condition which would influence his art and ultimately claim his life. Flanagan survived into his 40s despite the cystic fibrosis, an unusually long life considering those diagnosed with CF had a life expectancy of 17 years, and especially so since doctors did not expect Bob to live past the age of 7 or 8.

To battle his illness, Flanagan delved into the world of S&M, using a controlled pain to elevate his actual pain. As an artist, he destroyed boundaries between the stage and the hospital bed using wit and an uncompromising honesty. Some of his performances were notable for acts of extreme masochism (on at least one occasion he hammered a nail through his penis, while cracking jokes). He also wrote books and disturbingly humorous songs.

He was the subject of the documentary SICK: The Life & Death of Bob Flanagan, Supermasochist (1997), a film by Kirby Dick, which covers the final years of Bob’s life. I can not recommend this film enough. #destroytheday


Frankenhooker, Patty Mullin with @lourusconi ‘s painting…going home with a lucky collector. @monsterpaloozaofficial

Frankenhooker, Patty Mullin with @lourusconi ‘s painting…going home with a lucky collector. @monsterpaloozaofficial


The legend, Tom Savini, is taking home James Bonner’s Bub bust. A true honor. @monsterpaloozaofficial

The legend, Tom Savini, is taking home James Bonner’s Bub bust. A true honor. @monsterpaloozaofficial


Last day of @monsterpaloozaofficial join us and make today epic. #destroytheday

Last day of @monsterpaloozaofficial join us and make today epic. #destroytheday


Contest time at @monsterpaloozaofficial   First person to find me and tell me they love Wes Craven…wins this exclusive Wes tribute print. #horror

Contest time at @monsterpaloozaofficial First person to find me and tell me they love Wes Craven…wins this exclusive Wes tribute print. #horror