Hyaena Gallery

Evil soap is back in stock, too. Rub-A-Dub Beelzebub! #washyourself #cantgetcleanontheinside

Evil soap is back in stock, too. Rub-A-Dub Beelzebub! #washyourself #cantgetcleanontheinside


New art by @teacakery is making its way on the walls. #hyaena #blackmetalrooster #darkart #badass #digit

New art by @teacakery is making its way on the walls. #hyaena #blackmetalrooster #darkart #badass #digit


Hiding in the far reaches of the Chihuahua Desert, not far from El Paso,TX is a group of large natural rock basins, or “huecos”. These unusual rock formations collect and trap water in an otherwise arid region. For millennia, humans have used the huecos as a reliable source of water. The tanks were even used as a watering stop for the Butterfield Overland Mail Route, a precursor to the Pony Express .
Pictographs from several distinct tribes and peoples can be found all over the Hueco Tanks, some dating to as early as 6000-3000 BCE. These particular pictographs are in the Early Archaic Style, and are the oldest of the many different styles present on the tanks. There are over 3000 rock drawings on these natural catch-basins, hundreds of which are mask designs reminiscent of the still active Pueblan Katchina Cult, a religious belief in a group of powerful beings often represented by elaborate masks or in doll form. The Hueco Tanks are the only place in North America with such a large concentration of painted-mask designs.

Some drawings were made by early agriculturalists known as the Jornada Mogollon, others from Mescalero Apache Plains warriors. There are countless images of hunts and adventures had near the tanks, from up to 8000 years of various Native American cultures.

The huecos can be found on the 860-acre Hueco Tanks State Park. Tours of the tanks and pictographs are free with entry to the park. A visit to the park website to determine hours and reservation information is suggested as entrance into the park is limited. #destroytheday

Hiding in the far reaches of the Chihuahua Desert, not far from El Paso,TX is a group of large natural rock basins, or “huecos”. These unusual rock formations collect and trap water in an otherwise arid region. For millennia, humans have used the huecos as a reliable source of water. The tanks were even used as a watering stop for the Butterfield Overland Mail Route, a precursor to the Pony Express .
Pictographs from several distinct tribes and peoples can be found all over the Hueco Tanks, some dating to as early as 6000-3000 BCE. These particular pictographs are in the Early Archaic Style, and are the oldest of the many different styles present on the tanks. There are over 3000 rock drawings on these natural catch-basins, hundreds of which are mask designs reminiscent of the still active Pueblan Katchina Cult, a religious belief in a group of powerful beings often represented by elaborate masks or in doll form. The Hueco Tanks are the only place in North America with such a large concentration of painted-mask designs.

Some drawings were made by early agriculturalists known as the Jornada Mogollon, others from Mescalero Apache Plains warriors. There are countless images of hunts and adventures had near the tanks, from up to 8000 years of various Native American cultures.

The huecos can be found on the 860-acre Hueco Tanks State Park. Tours of the tanks and pictographs are free with entry to the park. A visit to the park website to determine hours and reservation information is suggested as entrance into the park is limited. #destroytheday



Happy holidays, from my neighborhood. #ittakesavalleyvillage

Happy holidays, from my neighborhood. #ittakesavalleyvillage


In Rome the cats have an ancient temple-complex all to themselves. Known as Largo di Torre Argentina, this archaeological wonder was excavated as part of Mussolini’s rebuilding efforts in 1929, revealing extensive multi-level temples that lie sunken 20 feet below modern street level. Besides several different temples, Torre Argentina also contains part of the famous Theater of Pompey, upon whose steps dictator Julius Caesar was betrayed and killed in 44 BCE. Today, volunteers at Torre Argentina care for approximately 250 cats. After the site was excavated, Rome’s feral cats moved in immediately, as they do all over the city, and the gattare, or cat ladies, began feeding and caring for them. Since the mid-1990s, the population has grown from about 90 to the current 250, and the organization has ramped up with care for sick or wounded cats, as well as an extensive spay and neuter program to keep the feral population in check. Most of the permanent residents have special needs - they are blind or missing legs or came from abusive homes.

On any given afternoon a small crowd gathers here to watch the cats sunbathe on ancient pillars and steps. At first it may be hard to spot the cats, but once you start to see them, they are everywhere. Visitors can admire the cats and their ruins from street level, volunteer, and even adopt cats.
Another Roman cat sanctuary is located at the Protestant Cemetery, near the Pyramid of Cestius. #destroytheday

In Rome the cats have an ancient temple-complex all to themselves. Known as Largo di Torre Argentina, this archaeological wonder was excavated as part of Mussolini’s rebuilding efforts in 1929, revealing extensive multi-level temples that lie sunken 20 feet below modern street level. Besides several different temples, Torre Argentina also contains part of the famous Theater of Pompey, upon whose steps dictator Julius Caesar was betrayed and killed in 44 BCE. Today, volunteers at Torre Argentina care for approximately 250 cats. After the site was excavated, Rome’s feral cats moved in immediately, as they do all over the city, and the gattare, or cat ladies, began feeding and caring for them. Since the mid-1990s, the population has grown from about 90 to the current 250, and the organization has ramped up with care for sick or wounded cats, as well as an extensive spay and neuter program to keep the feral population in check. Most of the permanent residents have special needs - they are blind or missing legs or came from abusive homes.

On any given afternoon a small crowd gathers here to watch the cats sunbathe on ancient pillars and steps. At first it may be hard to spot the cats, but once you start to see them, they are everywhere. Visitors can admire the cats and their ruins from street level, volunteer, and even adopt cats.
Another Roman cat sanctuary is located at the Protestant Cemetery, near the Pyramid of Cestius. #destroytheday


Now…refueling at Loaded. Come by, start a fight, and I’ll buy you a drink. #easter

Now…refueling at Loaded. Come by, start a fight, and I’ll buy you a drink. #easter


Merle Allin at the Museum of Death…burning shit up.

Merle Allin at the Museum of Death…burning shit up.


A few more pics from Santa Maria dell’Orazione e Morte. #destroytheday

A few more pics from Santa Maria dell’Orazione e Morte. #destroytheday


With skulls carved above the doorway and winged skeletons etched into plaques outside, the exterior of Santa Maria dell’Orazione e Morte (Saint Mary of the Prayer and Death) in Rome, Italy suits its macabre name. Once inside, visitors can make a small donation to the church and a nun will unlock the crypt for you. There is a short flight of stairs which leads to a chamber decorated with human bones; a large number of skulls, skeletons set in the wall, candelabras constructed of bones, etched skulls stacked on shelves, bones piled by the altar and made into a cross, and even chandeliers made with human vertebrate. A scythe lurks near the altar.

Santa Maria was built by a confraternity that assumed responsibility for interring abandoned corpses in Rome. Its charity was, and still is, supported by the Arciconfraternita di Santa Maria dell’Orazione e Morte, a purgatorial society dating to the 1560s.  While it used to include huge vaults where over 8000 bodies were buried, most of the vaults were destroyed during other construction in 1886. This chamber is all that remains. 

The church also contains a wonderful selection of artwork. Inside are frescoes of St. Anthony Abbot and St. Paul of Thebes by Giovanni Lanfranco, as well as works by Pier Leone Ghezzi and Lorenzo Masucci. A highlight above the main chapel’s altar is Ciro Ferri’s painting, Crucifixion (1680). #destroytheday

With skulls carved above the doorway and winged skeletons etched into plaques outside, the exterior of Santa Maria dell’Orazione e Morte (Saint Mary of the Prayer and Death) in Rome, Italy suits its macabre name. Once inside, visitors can make a small donation to the church and a nun will unlock the crypt for you. There is a short flight of stairs which leads to a chamber decorated with human bones; a large number of skulls, skeletons set in the wall, candelabras constructed of bones, etched skulls stacked on shelves, bones piled by the altar and made into a cross, and even chandeliers made with human vertebrate. A scythe lurks near the altar.

Santa Maria was built by a confraternity that assumed responsibility for interring abandoned corpses in Rome. Its charity was, and still is, supported by the Arciconfraternita di Santa Maria dell’Orazione e Morte, a purgatorial society dating to the 1560s. While it used to include huge vaults where over 8000 bodies were buried, most of the vaults were destroyed during other construction in 1886. This chamber is all that remains.

The church also contains a wonderful selection of artwork. Inside are frescoes of St. Anthony Abbot and St. Paul of Thebes by Giovanni Lanfranco, as well as works by Pier Leone Ghezzi and Lorenzo Masucci. A highlight above the main chapel’s altar is Ciro Ferri’s painting, Crucifixion (1680). #destroytheday